• Did you know

    6% of businesses report that they have suffered a confidentiality breach…

  • Did you know

    9% of businesses report that they have received phishing emails asking for data…

  • Did you know

    45% of businesses report that security incidents costs up to £120,000 per year…

  1. Websiteinsurance.co.uk #Cyber Alerts Newsletter 39

    By neil on 6th Jan 2012 | No Comments

    Security: Gloomy picture for 2012 as criminals shift tactics 

    McAfee has painted a gloomy security picture for 2012 in which enterprises and criminals shift to new platforms and tactics for securing and infiltrating networks. According to a v3 report, the company’s 2012 Threat Predictions Report said that attacks on industrial systems and embedded hardware will continue as utility companies increasingly use network-connected systems to control infrastructure. 

    Full report here

    Security: ‘Vast phishing attack’ against Apple customers 

    A ‘vast phishing attack’ that attempts to capture the credit card information of Apple customers was launched on Christmas day. PC World reports that according to a report from Mac security-software company Intego, the attack is an attempt to fool Apple customers into clicking on a link under the guise of updating the billing information of their accounts. 

    Full report here   

    Security: Researcher finds critical Wi-Fi flaw 

    Security researcher Stefan Viehböck has demonstrated a critical flaw in the Wi-Fi Protected standard, reports The Register. Wi-Fi Protected Setup is used to secure access to wireless networks and requires each router to have a unique eight-digit PIN. But the protocol used reports back after the first four digits have been entered, and indicates if they are right, which means they can be attacked separately. 

    Full report here               
                   

    Copyright: Court asked to dismiss claims against Google Books 

    Google asked a US Federal Court to dismiss copyright claims against its Google Books project by groups representing authors and photographers, saying the groups could not sue over copyrights they did not own. PC World reports that the Authors Guild and the American Association of Publishers charge that scanning the books without always seeking permission would violate copyrights. 

    Full report here